Science

Welcome to science at Oyster River High School!  While the courses we offer vary in their content focus, they all share the objective of helping our students learn how to ‘do science’.  Each course is designed around a foundation of asking questions, designing experiments to test ideas, and interpreting and presenting results.  Our collective goal is to help our students grow into more critical thinkers who are able to find the resources they need, make connections in the world around them, and differentiate between legitimate information and ‘fake news’.

While students are required to complete a minimum of two years of science in order to graduate, we strongly urge all students to explore the various electives we offer, both to broaden their backgrounds in science as well as to develop their perspective of the world around us.  Beyond the core of Introductory Biology, Earth, Oceans and Space (EOS), Chemistry, and Physics, we offer electives that range from semester-long courses (Forensics, Marine Biology, and Astronomy) to year-long courses such as Anatomy and Physiology, Environmental Science, and several AP selections.

The following competencies describe the skills that students will develop in each of our courses.  The content of each course provides the vehicle by which students are able to practice these skills, and as courses progress, the challenge level increases.

Science Department Competencies:

1) Nature of Science: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how science works and how it influences society.

2) Systems: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of living and nonliving systems and the interactions and processes within those systems.

3) Energy: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how energy is transferred within living and nonliving systems at different scales.

4) Patterns of Change: Students will be able to identify patterns of change in both living and nonliving systems.

5) Structure and Function: Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how structure relates to function in living and nonliving systems at different scales.

 

Faculty:


Tracey Benkosky
Sara Cathey
Celeste Best
Nate Oxnard
Michael Blouin
James Thibault 
Jon Bromley
Jennifer Wainwright